Archive for the ‘Social Mediums’ Category

Facebook & My Space-Safe Browsing Diagnostics-Reports for malware

Thursday, November 18th, 2010

Facebook Safe Browsing Diagnostics

Advisory provided by Google
Safe Browsing
Diagnostic page for facebook.com

What is the current listing status for facebook.com?

This site is not currently listed as suspicious.

Part of this site was listed for suspicious activity 21 time(s) over the past 90 days.

What happened when Google visited this site?

Of the 199823 pages we tested on the site over the past 90 days, 35 page(s) resulted in malicious software being downloaded and installed without user consent. The last time Google visited this site was on 2010-11-17, and the last time suspicious content was found on this site was on 2010-11-14.

Malicious software includes 1 trojan(s), 1 exploit(s). Successful infection resulted in an average of 2 new process(es) on the target machine.

Malicious software is hosted on 15 domain(s), including highclassv.net/, reycross.net/, trafficin002.com/.

25 domain(s) appear to be functioning as intermediaries for distributing malware to visitors of this site, including socialappguide.com/, textstream.co.za/, mancrushonmcslee.com/.

This site was hosted on 55 network(s) including AS32934 (FACEBOOK), AS20940 (AKAMAI), AS4788 (TMNET).

Has this site acted as an intermediary resulting in further distribution of malware?

Over the past 90 days, facebook.com appeared to function as an intermediary for the infection of 20 site(s) including messagedamour.fr/, facebook.com/dancingstuffbbjgeyox/, facebook.com/lickvmifkvxf/.

Has this site hosted malware?

No, this site has not hosted malicious software over the past 90 days.

Next steps:

* Return to the previous page.
* If you are the owner of this web site, you can request a review of your site using Google Webmaster Tools. More information about the review process is available in Google’s Webmaster Help Center.

Updated 14 hours ago

©2008 Google – Google Home

My Space Diagnostics

Advisory provided by Google
Safe Browsing
Diagnostic page for myspace.com

What is the current listing status for myspace.com?

This site is not currently listed as suspicious.

Part of this site was listed for suspicious activity 8 time(s) over the past 90 days.

What happened when Google visited this site?

Of the 92951 pages we tested on the site over the past 90 days, 748 page(s) resulted in malicious software being downloaded and installed without user consent. The last time Google visited this site was on 2010-11-17, and the last time suspicious content was found on this site was on 2010-11-15.

Malicious software includes 45 scripting exploit(s), 11 trojan(s).

Malicious software is hosted on 174 domain(s), including 77.78.239.0/, ojcow.home.pl/, slicktalk.net/.

203 domain(s) appear to be functioning as intermediaries for distributing malware to visitors of this site, including 77.78.239.0/, dzphotographyonline.com/, superstargirls.co.uk/.

This site was hosted on 31 network(s) including AS33739 (MYSPACE), AS20940 (AKAMAI), AS4788 (TMNET).

Has this site acted as an intermediary resulting in further distribution of malware?

Over the past 90 days, myspace.com appeared to function as an intermediary for the infection of 6 site(s) including myspace.com/index.cfm/, myspace.com/unknowncoatings/, myspace.com/total_misogyny/.

Has this site hosted malware?

No, this site has not hosted malicious software over the past 90 days.

Next steps:

* Return to the previous page.
* If you are the owner of this web site, you can request a review of your site using Google Webmaster Tools. More information about the review process is available in Google’s Webmaster Help Center.

Updated 15 hours ago

©2008 Google – Google Home

Facebook Privacy Settings-Why is it important?-How to set your facebook privacy settings.

Thursday, September 23rd, 2010

Why its important to know your facebook privacy settings:

Facebook is a great social medium which allows you to share information with friends & family. However if you have not set your privacy settings correctly facebook can and will share your information with third parties & people can view much of your profile information before they request to be added. As of next year Google is incorporating far more of facebooks information, already you can be googled and you facebook profile will be one of the top listings. Next year there will be an additional feature allowing searches for people.
How to set your facebook privacy settings:

In the top right hand corner of your facebook profile click on account to see a drop-down menu, and click privacy settings as pictured below:

Facebook Privacy Settings

Click link below to learn how to set your facebook privacy:

How to set my facebook privacy settings

Google Me Details Emerge: Social Layers and Building off Buzz

Sunday, September 19th, 2010

It’s hard to resist drawing comparisons between Google Me and Facebook, but as more details about Google’s ambitions to build a social network emerge, the more disparate the two become. Though Google Me was initially expected to be a standalone site, Google CEO Eric Schmidt recently revealed it will instead take a layered approach to Web socialization, weaving networking elements into preexisting Google products. Now, TechCrunch has uncovered new details about Google Me, including the news that the service will be built off Google Buzz.

“Google Me will produce an activity stream generated by all Google products. Google Buzz has been rewritten to be the host of it all. And the reason Google Buzz isn’t currently working in Google Apps is because they’ll use the latest Buzz to support the activity stream in Apps… All Google products have been refactored to be part of the activity stream, including Google Docs, etc. They’ll build their social graph around the stream,” unnamed sources who’ve worked with Google on the product told TechCrunch’s Michael Arrington.

The social layers approach is a good one — flat-out copying Facebook, as some blogs have accused, would probably get a big “meh” from the masses. Why bother with a Google Facebook when you can have a Facebook-Facebook? Also, giving the public what it wants — which is apparently even more social Web features — without requiring yet another bookmark or profile could be a recipe for streamlined success.

However, basing Google Me on Buzz’s foundation makes me nervous. Buzz was interesting but heavily flawed, and many people stayed away from it altogether. I’m surprised Google hasn’t shut it down like it did with its productivity collaboration suite, Wave — which was yet another embarrassing misstep for the company. And though Schmidt indicated that Google Me will be an opt-in service, thus reducing the chances of having an angry privacy backlash, it’s very possible that people won’t even know about or use Google Me — just like Buzz’s usage has been tepid at best due to obliviousness.

Brennon Slattery, PC World

Web users now on Facebook longer than Google

Sunday, September 12th, 2010

We already know that Facebook is the web’s biggest time sink. If you look at the average amount of time (according to Nielsen) users spend on the social network, Facebook is a clear winner over sites such as Google or Yahoo.

Now, according to comScore, Facebook is also first when it comes to the total amount of time users are spending on the site.

In August, U.S. web users spent 41.1 million minutes on Facebook, which was about 9.9 percent of their entire web-surfing time in that month.

In this same period, people spent 39.8 million minutes on all of Google’s sites, and those include another huge online timesink — YouTube.

comScore puts Yahoo in third place, with U.S. web users spending 37.7 million minutes on its sites, which was about 9.1 percent of their web surfing time in August.

The numbers are even more impressive when you consider that Facebook had just overtaken Yahoo in July, and in August last year U.S. web surfers had spent less than 5 percent of their online time on the social networking service.

Still, it hardly comes as a surprise: Facebook has been growing steadily in the last couple of years, and in July it announced it had over500 million active users.

If Facebook keeps growing, a year from now Google may find itself far behind Facebook when it comes to web users’ minutes.

But does Facebook have room for growth?

Mark Zuckerberg predicts the site’s userbase might even reach one billion. The number doesn’t sound too far-fetched, given that Facebook still has room for international growth — for example inChina and Russia.

Of course, comScore only counts users from the U.S., so the global picture is still blurry.

But the facts show that Facebook users spend a huge amount of time on the site, and it’s a worrying stat for Google.

Google’s many online properties (Gmail, Search and YouTube, to name a few) have vast influence and reach. But right now, without a large social networking property (Orkut doesn’t count as serious competition to Facebook anymore), Google will have a hard time snatching users’ time from Facebook’s hands.

By Stan Schroeder CNN

Yesterday Facebook rolled out a new feature called Places-How to Disable Facebook Places

Friday, August 27th, 2010

Yesterday Facebook rolled out a new feature called Places that lets you and your friends check in to locations, Foursquare-style. If you’d prefer to keep your location private, or at least stop your friends from posting it, here’s how.

If you’re not convinced that posting your location can be a bad thing, check out PleaseRobMe for some evidence. Of course, if you’re careful, check-ins aren’t inherently a bad thing. Whether or not you want to disable them is entirely up to you, but Facebook—yet again—has made the assumption that you want to take part in all of their privacy-eroding new features. If you don’t, or want a little more control over who can divulge your location, you can make this change pretty quickly through your privacy settings.

1) Log in to Facebook. From your Account menu, choose Privacy Settings. You’ll get something like the picture below. Click the Customize option (if it isn’t already selected) and then click the “Customize settings” link (it’s the one next to the pencil below the table depicting your current privacy settings).

How to Disable Facebook Places

2) Under the “Things I Share” heading, all the way at the bottom (of that section), there are two things you may want to change. By default “Places I check in” should be set to only be visible by your friends. If you want to limit it more or less, use the drop down menu to do so. I set mine to “Only Me,” which is as private as you’re going to get. Below that option is “Include me in ‘People Here Now’ after I check in.” It is enabled by default. This will let people know you’re at a particular location via the location’s page or in a search for people near you. Uncheck “Enable” if you don’t want this.

How to Disable Facebook Places

3) Lastly—and this is the important one—if you don’t want your friends to check you into Places, sharing your current location with a bunch of people you may or may not know, go down to the section called “Things Others Share” and find “Friends can check me in to Places.” Initially, mine wasn’t set to anything at all so the default option could be either choice. Regardless, set this to “Disabled” if you don’t want your friends checking you in. Keep in mind that any friend could potentially check you in anywhere. You don’t actually have to be there. If you don’t want anyone playing a practical joke and checking you in to a strip club, for example, this is a good thing to turn off.

How to Disable Facebook Places

UPDATE: As commenter Ryan G. points out, your location can be shared with friends’ applications as well. To turn that off, you have to go to a completely different section. Click the “Applications and Websites” link (pictured to the left) and then go to the “Info accessible through your friends” section. Click “Edit Settings” and you’ll see a bunch of boxes. Anything checked is available to Facebook apps that your friends are using. The last checkbox in this section is “Places I’ve visited,” so uncheck that if you don’t want your friends’ apps grabbing your location information as well.

Since this part is confusing a lot of people, here’s a quick video to demonstrate how to edit your application settings:

How to Disable Facebook Places

And that’s it! While it’s not so great that you’re opted-in to the new Places feature, fortunately it’s pretty easy to opt-out.

http://lifehacker.com/5616395/how-to-disable-facebook-places

Beware of suspicious friend requests. If you do not know the person.. the safest option is DO NOT add. Viruses are attached to these profiles…

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010

Beware of suspicious friend requests. If you do not know the person.. the safest option is DO NOT add. Viruses are attached to these profiles…

Default set to everyone-Your phone number displayed on facebook.-Facebook Privacy

Saturday, June 12th, 2010

Have you checked your recent privacy settings on facebook?

Facebook has not only changed their options & added new settings, they have also set the new options with a default of show to “everyone”and once again some information such as phone numbers are displayed to everyone unless you set it otherwise.

Check your settings

Check your who you display your phone number to!

Scroll down to mobile etc.. click drop down. Choose customise and set to only me or friends only.

Who sees your photos?

How does your profile display when searched for on facebook?
Basic Directory Information Settings

Facebook Privacy changes and controls explained-facebook security group

Thursday, May 27th, 2010

Facebook new privacy controls explained by Mark Zuckerberg.

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission has launched a new Facebook Page for OnGuardOnline.gov that provides practical tips from the federal government and the technology industry to help you avoid fraud, secure your computer, and protect your personal information. Check it out at OnGuardOnline.gov

Tip of the Week: Don’t click on suspicious-looking links, even if they’ve been sent or posted by friends. If it seems strange for a friend to be sharing a particular link, delete it, and notify the person right away.

Facebook new privacy controls explained by Mark Zuckerberg:
Facebook privacy explained-Mark Zuckerberg

If you would like to stay informed about the latest changes scams etc on facebook. You can join the facebook security group below:

Facebook security

Have you checked out the new feature that allows you to be notified any time your account is accessed from a device you haven’t approved? Try it out by going to “Account Security” on the Account Settings page.

Are you practicing safe behavior online? Check out this story fromThe New York Times

Thanks to Facebook security

Facebook’s forthcoming privacy changes — it’s all about the defaults

Wednesday, May 26th, 2010

Tomorrow Facebook will launch a host of new privacy controls that it says will be simpler for users to navigate. But what all keen observers will be watching are the default settings.

This is where Facebook will signal whether it has internalized much of the feedback critics have lobbed at it over the past six months.

This criticism is borne out of the somewhat mixed signals the social network has been sending since last fall. In December, the company launched detailed privacy controls, but users who had never adjusted their settings were defaulted into posting their content publicly. It also launched an instant personalization program last month so that partners like Pandora could offer custom experiences to users based on their preferences, but designed the program to be opt-out rather than opt-in.

Again, Facebook did a major privacy transition last month that turned people’s interests into links to Community or Fan Pages, which were by default public. If users didn’t want those interests to be public, they either had to delete them or copy and paste them into the bio section of their profile.

None of these alone was enough to merit a privacy backlash. In all cases, users have a choice; they can opt-out of instant personalization, not share likes or interests, and navigate through Facebook’s complicated controls to make most everything private.

But in concert, they suggest that the company — in pursuing its mission of making the world more open and connected — is nudging users toward progressively more public default settings, whether they want to come along for the ride or not. It’s not clear how many users actually understand how much of their content is public. You can see publicly shared status updates about sensitive topics like hysterectomies and prostate cancer here. There’s also a great infographic illustrating Facebook’s ever-evolving privacy defaults here.

Defaults are powerful. An idea that has caught on in public policy circles since U.S. President Barack Obama’s inauguration is “libertarian paternalism,” or the notion that people are often irrational decision-makers and need specially-designed choices to nudge them in a desired direction. Policy makers, for example, can auto-enroll people into saving for retirement or put healthy foods at eye-level in school cafeterias, so that kids are more likely to choose them over fatty foods.

Choice architecture, as this is called, can also be used to push people in less-than-savory directions, too. Grocery stores put food staples like milk and butter in the back so that consumers have to walk through aisles containing more expensive processed foods. Retail stores put cheap items near the check-out to encourage impulse buying. Too many choices can also bewilder consumers and lead them to make sub-optimal decisions or fail to even make a decision at all.

The key points are that, in choice architecture, there is no such thing as neutral design, and well-designed systems should accommodate human error, rather than exploit it.

The same idea can be applied to Facebook, which is probably one of the ultimate playgrounds for choice architecture. Small, subtle changes in the site’s interface can influence the behavior of hundreds of millions of people. Now, it’s perfectly fair to have default settings that are public, but only as long as your covenant with users, community norms and brand are all about being public, like Twitter. Otherwise, it’s potentially misleading to users.

The question is whether Facebook’s privacy settings are intentionally architected to be confusing or whether this is mostly just a byproduct of the company’s rapid growth. (You can imagine that designing privacy settings two years ago was a very different challenge from creating them now, when Facebook has more than 400 million users and plenty of them with more than 1,000 friends.)

“Many of you thought our controls were too complex,” the company’s chief executive Mark Zuckerberg wrote yesterday in an op-ed. “Our intention was to give you lots of granular controls; but that may not have been what many of you wanted. We just missed the mark.”

He said simpler privacy controls were coming and that there would be an easy way to turn off all third-party services. He didn’t say whether defaults would change, though, and the company declined to comment further.

If the company is really sincere about helping users manage their privacy, then not only will it simplify the controls but it will move the defaults away from being completely public. That way the site will at least guarantee that novice users won’t unknowingly share news about their hysterectomies or chemotherapy with the world.

Social beat.
Facebook-Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook: privacy changes ‘as soon as possible’, says Zuckerberg-telegraph

Facebook chief executive and founder Mark Zuckerberg has admitted that users find the social network’s controversial privacy controls “too complex”, but has said that the website will move to adjust them so that they are simpler “as soon as possible”.

Writing in the Washington Post, Zuckerberg said that the site’s 400 million users were “a challenge to keep satisfied”, but continued to claim that “if people share more, the world will become more open and connected. And a world that’s more open and connected is a better world”.
He said that, however, user reactions to new changes to privacy settings suggested that “sometimes we move too fast – and after listening to recent concerns, we’re responding. Our intention was to give you lots of granular controls; but that may not have been what many of you wanted. We just missed the mark”.

Zuckerberg conceded that “there needs to be a simpler way to control your information,” and said that “in the coming weeks, we will add privacy controls that are much simpler to use”.

He added that the site operates under five principles, which give users control over their own information, and which also ensure that Facebook is free and does not provide access to private information for advertisers or users or services that individuals do not wish to permit.

Some campaigners, such as those behind the website Quitfacebookday, may however continue to be worried by Zuckerbergs’s commitment to “keep focused on achieving our mission of giving people the power to share and making the world more open and connected”. More than half of Facebook’s users have already indicated that they could quit the site, and Google searches for how to leave Facebook have increased substantially over the last few weeks.

FarmVille -could be evicted from Facebook

Friday, May 21st, 2010

Social gaming company Zynga’s creations — including the popular FarmVille — could be evicted from Facebook in a bitter dispute over payment changes, The (London) Times reported Friday.

Farmville

At the center of the dispute is the social network’s introduction of Facebook credits, a virtual currency that it insists is the only type of cash that can be used on the site. It takes a 30 percent commission every time the currency is used.

Zynga believes this is prohibitive and last year it launched its own site for the game, farmville.com, and is weighing up whether to launch its own rival social networking site.

The social network also allegedly tried to force Zynga, the Californian start-up company that created FarmVille, to keep its game primarily on the Facebook site. In response, Zynga was rumored to have threatened to leave Facebook, although the company reportedly tried to retreat from that position in recent days.

The growth of Facebook was attributed in part to the 83 million players of FarmVille and other Zynga games, including Mafia Wars, FishVille and Cafe World.

Although FarmVille can be played for free, it became a significant money-spinner for its creator, with players buying virtual items for their farms
with real cash. Zynga, which launched the game in 2007, has estimated annual revenues of $150 million.

Sources at Facebook described Zynga as a bad actor, which is putting profits before its users, and suggested that if the situation persisted it would be best if Zynga’s games left Facebook altogether. A spokeswoman for Zynga declined to comment.

Read more at the Times of London.